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Cloud Security

The Truth About MAC Spoofing

By | BYOD Security, Cloud Security, Network Access Control, Network Security, Threat Detection & Response | No Comments

The threat behind MAC spoofing

When implementing any insurance policy, you need to start with estimating the level of risk, the probability of that risk, and the potential damage should that risk become a reality.

One of the network risks that is often presented to demonstrate the ineffectiveness of 802.1x solutions is the ease of bypassing modern network access control (NAC) by using MAC spoofing. Usually, this involves spoofing the network printer or other vulnerable device.

Now, let’s put aside the fact that network printers today can support certificate or credential-based authentication, and that certain products have remedies against such attempts even when the authentication is based on MAC.

Let’s consider: is MAC spoofing a legitimate threat or an exaggerated, manageable flaw?

But before I try to analyze this risk, I want to point out the biggest advantage a NAC solution can give an organization to cope with modern cyber security threats: the ability to apply dynamic segmentation based on device type or identity.

Without going into too much detail, NAC is one of the only systems that can help you prevent lateral movement, indirectly allowing you to identify breaches and directly helping you to prevent the compromise of your crown jewels.

The threat landscape

Here are some of the most common adversaries when it comes to MAC spoofing:

  • The employee – a disgruntled current or former employee
  • The guest – a contractor, customer, patient, etc. who physically visits your organization for a period of time
  • The hacker – a malicious person trying to attack your network and steal information, causing harm to your organization

And here are the most common attack surfaces:

  • Wifi
  • Wired, ethernet switches

One caveat: most wifi environments contain managed devices. So, for devices that do not have an 802.1x supplicant, and thus does not support certificate-based authentication (or credentials based), it is easy to setup an isolated segment and significantly lower the risk of attack.

As such, we’ll put our focus on examining wired environments, and how they’re vulnerable to the above adversaries.

Adversaries in-depth

Let’s be clear – MAC spoofing requires some technical knowledge to execute, which the non-technical lay person typically does not possess. Those doing it know what they’re doing, and they know it’s wrong.

With that said, it’s important to point out that a lot of damage is caused by the unintended – i.e. people clicking on a link in an email, deleting the wrong record or file, or even dropping a laptop into a pool.

The employee

Employees should be trustworthy. If they’re not, cyber security is likely not your problem. But, when someone is fired, laid off, or even just mistreated at work, there always exists the potential for them to hold a grudge. It’s human nature.

Disgruntled employees can pose a big risk. If an employee still works for an organization and he/she is determined to do damage, that’s a problem that’s nearly impossible to prevent. The network connection alone is not going to stop he/she from stealing data or worse. This individual likely already has access through other corporate devices and the credentials to access whatever data he/she wants.

At the end of the day, however, this individual’s risk of MAC spoofing can be categorized as “very low” with “low” probability and “low” potential for damage. The reason being is that the potential damage done is not necessarily related to network connection. The first line of defense against a disgruntled current of former employees is physical barriers – i.e. locked doors and other physical security.

The guest

A guest visiting your office might want to connect to your network. Most likely, this guest will not go to great lengths to hack your network if they are initially blocked. By supplying a guest network, such as a guest wifi, you will effectively eliminate that risk all together. Thus, like the employee, this individual’s risk of MAC spoofing can be categorized as “very low” for both probability and damage.

The hacker

A hacker will need physical access to your network in order to do his/her job. Today, spearhead attacks can enable hackers to access your networks from afar. Doing so, however, typically requires some sort of motive.

This motivation is often dependent upon the type of business you operate. If you’re in military and defense, for example, you likely have a higher than average risk of being the target of such an attack. The same going for banking and financial services, healthcare and any other industry with highly sensitive and confidential data.

For most organizations, the threat of physical access hacking is typically low, while the potential for damage could be high. Should a retailer fear physical burglary just because a new device has connected to its network? I think not.

In conclusion

For most organizations, the risk of MAC spoofing is almost non-existent. This is usually fairly easy for an auditor to demonstrate, and would appear as part of a comprehensive security report. So in reality, the perception of the threat is that it’s a much larger problem than it actually is.

You can also prevent MAC spoofing by implementing stronger authentication methods that are fairly common today. One of the major roles of NAC is to provide secure authentication and authorization to the network. Thus, even if authentication is somehow breached, authorization serves as a second layer of defense that can limit access by putting potential individuals of risk in a specific “narrow” segment.

The segmentation of specific types of MAC-based devices is a best practice in NAC. Even if spoofing occurs, such a device won’t be able to access a particularly sensitive VLAN, such as those in Finance or HR, if proper segmentation has been established through your network security policies.

What Kind of WiFi Protected Access Should You Use to Secure Your Enterprise?

By | BYOD Security, Cloud Security, IoT Security, Network Security, Portnox Technology | No Comments

When examining WiFi security, the first layer of defense is the method being used to authenticate to the network. The most widely used methods of authentication are Open authentication, WPA2-PSK (Pre-Shared Key) and WPA2-Enterprise (read more about WPA protocols below).

authenication typesOther authentication methods such as WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) and WPA-PSK (without the 2, also referred to as WPA-Personal) are used as well, but they are relatively easy to hack, and therefore are not really worth mentioning, besides making a general note here – to utterly avoid them.

Open Authentication

As the name implies, an open authentication network allows access to all, and users are not required to authenticate at the association level. It is important to know that open networks are not encrypted, and so everything transmitted can be seen by anyone in its vicinity.

The best security practice is to completely avoid connecting to open networks. If there is an immediate need to connect, it is best not to allow devices to connect automatically but rather to select the network manually in the device settings. Open networks are easily forged, and hacking tools such as Pineapple use the fact that mobile devices are constantly searching to connect automatically to an open network. These tools perform Man-in-the-middle attacks to steal data such as passwords, credit cards, etc.

wifi networks

WPA / WPA2 / WPA3

WPA stands for WiFi Protected Access. This authentication method uses different encryption algorithms to encrypt the transport. Therefore, this type of network cannot be forged easily, unlike open networks, and users get privacy. Today, WPA2 is probably the most commonly used method to secure WiFi networks.

Sadly, WPA and WPA2 protocols have been hacked and are considered to be less secure. Performing a WPA2 hack requires a lot of time and is somewhat theoretical. Slowly, we are noticing a move to the WPA3 method, but for that to happen, different infrastructure is needed to support that protocol.

WPA2-PSK

WPA2-PSK (and WPA3-PSK) is WiFi Protected Access (WPA) with a Pre-Shared Key. In simple terms, it is a shared password to access the WiFi network. This method is commonly used for home and small office WiFi networks. Even in a small office setting, using this method is problematic, because each time an employee leaves the company, the password must be replaced; otherwise, the former employee could still connect to the company WiFi.

Furthermore, employees tend to share the password with guests, visitors and contractors in the building, and you shouldn’t have the whole building connecting to the internet at your expense, risking the security of your data and assets in the process.

WPA2-Enterprise

This method, also referred to as WPA-802.1X mode, authenticates to WiFi by using different identities instead of a single password. An identity can be credentials (user + password) or it can be a digital certificate.

This authentication method is better suited for enterprise networks and provides much better security for wireless networks. It typically requires a RADIUS authentication server as well as a configuration process to different repositories, enabling the organization to authenticate different types of endpoints.

The underlying protocols to secure the authentication vary between different Extensible Authentication Protocols such as EAP-TTLS / EAP-TLS, EAP-PEAP, each one representing a different type of authentication method and level of security.

With WPA2-Enterprise one can use advanced features such as assigning each endpoint after authentication to a specific VLAN or assigning ACLs (Access Control Lists) to specific sections. Additionally, enterprises can audit the connection with additional details. These features are important as they allow enterprises to properly secure their wireless networks and to make sure that they are compliant with security best practices.

Portnox CLEAR

CLEAR is a SaaS, cloud-delivered, WiFi access control solution that allows you to secure your WiFi based on WPA2/3-Enterprise, using personal identities or digital certificates. CLEAR supports a wide range of authentication providers, from on-premises AD through cloud providers such as GSuite and Azure AD. CLEAR comes with a cloud-RADIUS, therefore there is no overhead, as there is no equipment to install or maintain. It requires no training or skilled personal to deploy and operate. In less than 10 minutes, large and small companies are deploying CLEAR’s enterprise-grade Wi-Fi security.

See a Demo of CLEAR – Please fill out this form:



How are corporate endpoints going to be Authenticated and Authorized when your Active Directory is migrated to the Cloud?

By | Cloud Security | No Comments

Currently, many Network Access Control (NAC) solutions support 802.1X authentication on wireless and wired networks by using Microsoft Domain attributes, such as the credentials of domain users or computer domain membership. In addition, there are plenty of domain-group synchronization scenarios for applying access policies and posture assessments.

Let’s think of an example, such as an organization where the members of a development team are allowed to connect to the corporate wireless network and are then assigned a VLAN or an access list upon successful authentication. Another example could be a finance team whose members are authorized access to the network once their endpoints are running the latest versions of antivirus and their drives are adequately encrypted, while at the same time, helpdesk team members are only required to have the most recent antivirus updates.

Most NAC solutions can handle these basic scenarios with an on-premises RADIUS server and an on-premises Active Directory, but what are you going to do if your organization decides to move the Active Directory to the cloud, for example, to Azure?

Azure AD and 802.1X

As part of the global trending increase in cloud data consumption, Gartner predicts that by 2023 80% of enterprises will also adopt two or more cloud-based security services. In this category we have seen a shift in enterprises from using on-premises Active Directories to cloud-delivered Active Directories. This significant change has added the need to consider certain adjustments to corporate information security.

One of these adjustments pertains to 802.1X authentication by domain attributes. Have you ever thought about 802.1X and Azure AD together? Or how network access control solutions will be able to adapt from the former on-premises legacy security vision to pure cloud-to-cloud integrations?

Converting your access and authentication controls to suit Azure AD requires the ability to have visibility into all devices before they connect to the network no matter where they are connecting from – VPN, wired, wireless or cloud. If security best practices are important at your organization, this visibility should include checking each endpoint, profiling it in terms of its security posture and providing it with a certain score. Once your system has this information it is possible to mitigate risks by applying controls that either prohibit suspicious endpoints from connecting to the enterprise network or more sensitive sections of it, or forcing them to update their security to be able to gain access.

Pure Cloud to Cloud Integrations

This is where cloud-delivered NAC solutions can benefit our new Azure AD players.  One of the pioneer features in cloud-delivered NAC is pure cloud to cloud integration with Active Directory in Azure. By deploying it, you will be able to authenticate and authorize users and endpoints by Az-AD attributes without installing anything on-premises. Enabling Azure Active Directory Domain Services is not mandatory for authentication, so everything can be cloud-based and agentless.

If your organization is in the middle of a migration process, and you have both on-premises and AD-Az users, the ideal solution is to enable integration with Azure via a hybrid NAC solution, where your Azure users are managed by a cloud-delivered NAC and Azure integration, and your non-Azure users are managed by an on-premises NAC Directory Broker.

Furthermore, it is recommended to have a NAC solution with a readily available integration with Microsoft Intune cloud service where you will be able to use Intune agents for setting your company’s risk assessment policies and thus enhance a pure cloud-to-cloud interaction in your organizational services.

For those interested in reviewing the future of simplified cloud-delivered network security, I would recommend reading more about how it works here.