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Portnox’s Predictions for Cybersecurity Trends in 2018

By | Cloud Security, IoT, Network Access Management, Network Security, Our Technology, Threat Detection and Response | No Comments

2017 was a very busy year for Portnox, yet throughout we aimed to address cybersecurity trends through our product offerings – Portnox CORE and Portnox CLEAR. With the highest number of ransomware attacks on record in 2017, we introduced a Rapid Ransomware Response and Control feature to our on-premise NAC solution, Portnox CORE, as well as the ability to see and control Internet of Things (IoT) devices through the IoT Visibility Radar. Portnox CLEAR, our cloud solution for network access control and risk management, was introduced to the market, and with its features for ensuring business continuity and securing the mobile workforce. The ability of our products to adequately address 2017 received commendation in the form of various industry awards and recognitions from leading publications and security experts.
Looking forward to 2018, the security landscape will shift and focus more heavily on IoT security, blockchain trends, automation and workforce mobility.

Here are some of our insights on what the 2018 cybersecurity landscape will look like:

  1. Extension of Automation: Together with AI and machine intelligence trends, automation will likely take center stage in 2018 as the leading security trend. Microsoft recently announced that it will begin automated anti-virus updates through its Windows Defender, which means that users and organizations will no longer have a choice when it comes to patching endpoints and software. This is good news, because it ensures that more actors have adequate security postures, and it makes sense for modular devices (like IoT) that present difficulties when it comes to firmware upgrades. Yet automation also creates challenges, namely for industries dependent on older versions of software, firmware and operating systems, such as healthcare and finance. Automated security updates could put the business continuity of these organizations at risk, and with potentially life-threatening and economically risky consequences. In addition, automated security updates across the board could actually make it easier for hackers to carry out large-scale attacks that will affect a larger number of endpoints.
  2. Blockchain and the Hacking of Applications: While many believe that the blockchain is “unhackable”, in the last year we have seen an increase in the number of attacks against blockchain-based applications. The vulnerabilities do not arise from the blockchain itself, but rather the applications that run on the blockchain. Social engineering will be used to extract private keys. Another possible blockchain hack, which has already been proven possible, is through other blockchain technologies such as Ethereum, which is an organization that’s committed to being open source for third-party applications. This creates a vulnerability because almost all applications have bugs can be manipulated by hackers as an attack surface.
  3. DDoS Ransomware: Creating a new and more pungent form of blackmail, DDoS and ransomware are joining forces to topple enterprise progress in digital transformation, while reaping monetary benefits. These attacks are made possible by using botnets, or large groups of “zombie” devices – which often happen to be Internet of Things devices, such as webcams – to funnel traffic to a malware-infected web address that, in turn, extract data from the accessing endpoint and demand ransoms for the return of that encrypted data. These attacks are often called “sinkhole” attacks because the DDoS traffic is being directed to sites that contain dangerous malware. With the wide adoption of Internet of Things devices in the enterprise, and the rise in ransomware demands, it’s likely that we’ll be seeing more of these attacks in the next year.
  4. Growing Regulation of IoT Security: Regulations governing IoT security features are beginning to be drafted, but there is still not enough demand from the consumer side to warrant manufacturer investment in security features. This begs a major question in 2018 of whether governments, in similar fashion to the US and EU, will begin issuing security regulations on IoT device manufacturers that protect consumers and companies from digital risk. Together with GDPR and other compliance regulations, we are likely to see more governments and industry authorities stepping up to enforce privacy, safety and security regulations on IoT manufacturers.
  5. Mobility of the Workforce: With more employees working remotely, organizations are enjoying a significant drop in their capital expenditures (many have even given up on the physical office space), while directing operational expenditures at digital transformation trends such as cloud and BYOD. Workforce mobility is a good thing for companies’ balance sheets, but the technological flexibility it affords results in more areas of cybersecurity vulnerability for the enterprise network. Companies that are set on accommodating mobile workforce trends will be investing in more endpoint, network and cloud security solutions that protect access and assets across a variety of locations and in various connected environments.

At Portnox, we will continue innovating our access control offerings to provide solutions to 2018 security trends and challenges, providing our customers with valuable, holistic solutions to protect their networks.
Here’s to a great 2018!

Easy 802.1X

By | Cloud Security | No Comments

The IEEE standard for port-based authentication, 802.1X, has been around since the early 2000’s, but in recent years has been met with frustration from network administrations and architectural experts. While 802.1X is well suited to the needs of the wired, desktop-dependent enterprise, with the shift to wireless networks, together with an upsurge of BYOD and Internet of Things (IoT) devices, deployment of 802.1X has become more of headache than a help.

Much of the criticism for 802.1X centers around the difficulty of deployment, namely that certain hardware infrastructure, such as RADIUS authentication and user repository servers, are required. In addition, with an increase of mobile devices in the enterprise, 802.1X is not able to provide enough contextual information on devices to allow for effective security controls. Finally, the difficulty of deployment involves the allocation of agents, which must be carefully managed on endpoints and could become a nuisance for employees if they are constantly required to enter their access credentials.

So Why Reconsider 802.1X?

Despite these technical difficulties, 802.1X has proven to be the strongest method for authenticating devices on the corporate network due to its continuous and direct communication with authenticating servers as opposed to pre/post scanners or the use of logs. The benefits for centralized management and enhanced security should not be deserted based on the sheer complexity of 802.1X deployments.

802.1X Delivered as a Cloud Service

Now, there is another way. With the growth of cloud computing technologies, Portnox CLEAR offers a solution that allows for simple deployment of 802.1X authentication , without compromising on security across the enterprise. By deploying RADIUS and user repository servers from the cloud, and delivering 802.1X as a software-defined cloud service, admins can embrace the benefits of 802.1X authentication by deploying a zero-touch solution that eliminates geo-redundancies. In a matter of minutes, admins can see and control every device connecting to their network and issue agents to monitor and control those devices with one swift action.

To find out how 802.1X authentication from the cloud works, read more in our White Paper, “802.1X Authentication Is Simpler Than You Think“, or TRY PORTNOX CLEAR NOW!

Four Tips on Keeping Your Network Safe During the Holidays

By | Network Security | No Comments

The holiday season is a busy time for all of us and full of excitement. Yet as employees are likely to be working from home over their vacation, or from other remote locations such as hotels or even near the pool, there are some key steps that organizations should take to secure their network for remote access:

  1. Device Patching: Ensure that all devices accessing the corporate network are up-to-date on their security and anti-virus patches. As there will be managed, and, likely, a good deal of unmanaged devices accessing the network, send out email communication to employees ahead of the holidays with a request to update their devices. In addition, if using a network access control solution, set a policy that requires the latest patch updates in granting access. That way, even if a device isn’t updated, it will be blocked access until its posture is updated.
  2. Take Note of Your Inventory: Take the holiday season as an opportunity to gain a clear understanding of your inventory, namely unmanaged devices that are likely to be used by employees while working remotely. Ask employees to share information on the devices that they use at home to get a better understanding of any potential vulnerabilities, asking employees to patch and update those devices as well. In addition, get an understanding of which managed devices will remain in the office and ensure they are updated.
  3. Multi-factor Authentication is a Must! Deploy a VPN solution that requires MFA for network and cloud access. MFA ensures that employees are more cognizant when accessing the network. In addition, set the security policies for remote VPN access to reflect those of your network. Lastly, let employees know that network security will be on high alert in your holiday message (it could be the same message sent about patch updates).
  4. Automate Where Possible: Network security admins are no different in that they want to enjoy time with their families over the holidays, so automate security actions where possible. By deploying a network access control solution that automates network security actions based on policy, security admins can ensure that their networks are secure, without ever stepping foot into the office. And, as mentioned above, if admins communicate with employees regarding heightened security and patch updates, it’s unlikely that they will receive frantic IT calls over the break. In a word – network security admins that want to enjoy their holiday break should automate, automate, automate!

Of course, the most important tip of them all is – enjoy the holiday season by keeping network access secure and vulnerability free! With Portnox’s network access control solutions you can control access from anywhere to control exposure to digital business risks, wherever and whenever they may arise.

Try Portnox CLEAR – Network Access Control-as-a-Service

Portnox 2018 Security Predictions

By | Network Security | No Comments


Portnox’s CEO and Co-Founder Ofer Amitai shares his 2018 security predictions with Dan Patterson at TechRepublic. The discussion kicks off with the rise of IoT devices and the likelihood of regulations on IoT device manufacturers and why there is a market failure. Next, Ofer continues with the rise of DDoS ransomware attacks and how they might look like in 2018. Then he covers the benefits associated with the rise of automation with security solutions, concluding by touching on the potential hacking of blockchain applications.

Check out the full video here for our predictions on the state of the 2018 security landscape.

Revitalized NAC for LAN and Cloud

By | Cloud Security | No Comments

As long as enterprise organizations try to maintain private networks, the challenge of determining which devices are considered safe for entry will remain. Whether this access decision is made using physical or virtual enforcement controls does not matter much from a policy perspective. Organizations desiring private LANs will simply want something workable to determine which devices are allowed admission, and which are not.

Traditional enterprise local area security teams have relied on a technology known as network access control or NAC to provide such policy enforcement. NAC is sort of like transportation security at your local airport: You arrive at a checkpoint, you present requested credentials, you go through some careful screening, and then an access decision is made. None of this is convenient, and none of it happens instantaneously. But we all agree that it is necessary.

What are the prospects for NAC in a world where the traditional LAN is being rapidly evolved by mobile and cloud? And what of the disappointment many security experts have previously expressed with NAC?

Enterprise NAC faces challenges, and many 802.1X-based implementations burdened by unbridled complexity. But the prospects for NAC in the modern enterprise are dramatically improving, coupled with powerful means for extending such protections to the cloud. “Next generation network access controls for cloud,” according to Portnox CEO Ofer Amitai, “will be a critically important component of the virtual enterprise.”

The original approaches to NAC had several challenges from the outset. First, they tended to be vendor specific, with required endpoint agents, and mitigations based on network traffic manipulation. These methods carried considerable downside; for example, few non-trivial networks are built on the capability and offerings of a single network vendor. Even in the presence of standards, interoperability issues were often the root cause of problems.

Portnox has focused its NAC product efforts on addressing these challenges directly for both the enterprise LAN and the extended hybrid cloud (to include IoT systems as well). Seamless, agnostic coverage of multiple vendor deployments, for example, is one of the focus areas of Portnox – and this should be welcome news to any network security manager supporting complex functional requirements for the hybrid enterprise.

Perhaps the most evolved NAC consideration in the Portnox suite is its emphasis on visibility across access layers. Surprisingly, early attempts at visibility from NAC were downplayed, simply because the (stubborn) presumption was that access policy would be enforced at LAN admission time. This carries the logical assumption that only good devices would ever be permitted entry to the LAN – which we all know is not how things evolved.

All of this is good news for any CISO team operating on an existing perimeter-based LAN (which means essentially every CISO team), with clear transition on-going toward hybrid cloud. The requirements to protect admission and entry to the corporate network remains a control demand in every framework I’ve ever seen. It, therefore, stands to reason that teams should partner with NAC vendors who understand the present – as well as the future.

Tips to Stay Secure in the Mobile Enterprise

By | Cloud Security | No Comments

Enterprise mobility, or an approach to the workforce that enables employees to do their work from any location using available devices and applications, is a growing trend tied to digital transformation. In a 2016 survey conducted by Harris Poll, 90% of IT decision makers marked enabling enterprise mobility as a significant chunk of their IT spend due to its positive impact on workplace satisfaction, customer engagement, competitive stance and operational productivity. Yet despite the benefits of workforce mobility for a company’s business, there are a number of inherent IT security concerns that come along with the shift away from the office.

Enterprise mobility is strongly tied to BYOD trends in the enterprise that encourage employees to use their own smart devices (smartphones, tablets, laptops and watches) instead of investing extraneously dedicated corporate devices. The up-side of this trend is the budgetary savings, but the downside is that IT departments have less control over what’s connecting to the enterprise network and a weaker understanding of the vulnerabilities BYOD devices may introduce. Whether an employee intends to or not, their device may introduce cyber threats to the network that are difficult to control, as the device is not managed. Therefore, for companies that want to securely engage in BYOD and enterprise mobility, an agentless network visibility and control solution is essential, filling in the gaps on device health posture and providing methods to address threats, if they arise.

Another issue with enterprise mobility is location. Just as the location of a store is directly tied to how much it sells, the location of a connection, no matter where, is a good determiner of its security If an employee heads out on vacation with their laptop to do some work, you want to ensure that they can securely access company data without compromising it. Some IT departments set a range of valid locations from which employees can connect, but this limits the scope of activity for mobile, international organizations. Therefore, a network security solution that can provide visibility and automated methods of control will ensure that “sketchy” connections won’t jeopardize the safety of the entire network; and if they do, those connecting devices will be automatically blocked or quarantined until they are in a location with a safe connection.

A third, but by no means final, issue with enterprise mobility is that it is directly tied to the cloud computing trend. While this is great news, for a variety of reasons that we lay out here, many cloud applications only have rudimentary authentication methods that ensure the employee connecting is really who they say they are. Therefore, it’s important to have stronger authentication measure in place, either tied to a RADIUS server, Active Directory or based on a multi-factor authentication mechanism when they are connecting, be it over a wireless network or VPN connection. The cloud can definitely be trusted, but with the spike in cyber attacks such as distributed denial of service attacks and malware, it’s a good idea to add an extra layer of protection for accessing company documentation over the cloud.

The pace with which companies are embracing enterprise mobility leads many to believe that office building could soon be a thing of the past. However, it is important to remember that while employees may seem to have all the tools they need to effectively complete their tasks remotely – a laptop computer and phone connection – there is important network security ground to be laid prior to enabling this shift. By controlling access to the company network and its data, enterprises can safely engage in the mobility trend with the confidence that their network is as safe as it would be if everyone was still working from the office.

National Cyber Security Awareness Month is all about sharing knowledge to promote a safer and more secure internet environment for all users. When you hear of threats, inform your peers to prevent spreading, and always remain wary of what you search, receive and send over the internet. Awareness and education are the best ways to beat hackers!

Stay #CyberAware

A New IoT Botnet Is Upon Us – What You Need To Know

By | IoT | No Comments

As if we all haven’t gotten over the Mirai botnet attack that happened last year, there’s news of a new IoT botnet in town. “IoTroop” or “Reaper” as it is being called by security researchers at Check Point and Qihoo 365 that discovered the attack, is said to affect millions of devices, but it’s still early days with information still being compiled on the full list of vulnerabilities.

So far, 9 exploitable vulnerabilities have been identified in Wireless IP security cameras from manufacturers such as GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, AVTECH, NETGEAR, MikroTik, Linksys, Synology, and others. Check Point and Qihoo report that they identified recurring security vulnerabilities in the IoT devices beginning from the end of September, but report that the recruitment phase of the botnet attack is still underway, with up to 10,000 new devices compromised each day.

IoTrooper/Reaper appears to use some vestiges of code from the Mirai attack, but as opposed to the Mirai attack that recruited IoT devices with factory default or missing telnet credentials, this botnet attack dives deeper into inherent IoT hardware and software vulnerabilities. This makes the potential for recruitment much greater in this current attack, garnering the potential to take down the entire internet, according to experts. These “thingbots”, as they are called,  carry out distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks to the similar effect of Mirai, or create the possibility of an anonymity network, which allows for anonymous surfing of the internet and preventing network surveillance.

Before panic over the potential damage ensues, know that there are ways to secure IoT devices and prevent them from being recruited as thingbots. The first step is to check if there are available firmware updates for network-connected IoT devices (particularly those from manufacturers listed above), and to verify if your security solutions have picked up on one of the 9 published vulnerabilities being targeted.

Next, a rule of thumb with all IoT devices is to disable the peer-to-peer (P2P) communication mechanism that’s available on many security cameras and DVRs. With P2P enabled, hackers can remotely locate and gain access to vulnerable devices that may not be connected to the internet. In addition, consult with security professionals regarding your IoT security stack – if you aren’t using an IoT visibility and detection solution, now is the time to consider the investment. With IoT botnet attacks proliferating, organizations should do everything in their power to understand and protect their enterprise IoT environment.

Finally, and most importantly, don’t panic. At the moment, we know very little about the intentions, scope and warpath of the IoTroop/Reaper attack, so don’t jump to any conclusions just yet and do not abruptly disconnect connected devices; if those devices are infected, they could cause significant network-wide damage once disconnected, not to mention data loss.

If we thought that Mirai was as bad as IoT botnet attacks could get, it appears that IoTroop/Reaper is here to prove otherwise.

Find out about Portnox’s IoT Security Solutions and start protecting your network from botnet attacks today.

Portnox integrates with Check Point’s ThreatCloud solution to provide complete control and strong security for enterprise network IoT.

What KRACK Means For Your Wireless Networks

By | Threat Detection and Response | No Comments

Last week, news surfaced of a serious vulnerability with the Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) protocol that is used to secure the majority, if not most, protected Wi-Fi networks. According to the research, published by Mathy Vanhoef of the University of Leuven, the vulnerability lies in the 4-way handshake that is part of the WPA2 protocol, which can be manipulated to carry out man-in-the-middle attacks on network users, forcing them to reinstall the encryption key. Furthermore, Android and Linux devices can be tricked into reinstalling an all-zero encryption key, making it possible for the hacker to intercept and manipulate traffic from these devices when they are connected to the WPA2 network.

The implications of discovering such a vulnerability are huge as most modern networks are protected through the WPA2 encryption protocol, but there are a few caveats. For instance, in order to carry out a KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attacks), the hacker needs to be in close logical proximity to the Wi-Fi range. In addition, browsing over HTTPS may protect some traffic from interception, as it is protected with an additional level of encryption. Yet, at the moment, it appears that most devices that support Wi-Fi are affected, including Android, Linux, Apple, Windows, OpenBSD, MediaTek, Linksys and more.

So what are the implications of the discovery of KRACK for the enterprise network?

By manipulating the KRACK vulnerabilities, hackers (or even employees, guests and contractors) within close vicinity of the Wi-Fi network can eavesdrop and alter information being transmitted over the network. While the location caveat does have its benefits for smaller and tighter organizations, for larger organizations with far-reaching networks, it provides little solace.

Though little is still known about how the KRACK vulnerability will be addressed (or when a new secure wireless encryption protocol will be issued), there are a number of steps that enterprise IT departments can take to secure their data.

  1. Install the latest security patches and updates: This is a given, following any vulnerability, and should become standard practice throughout the enterprise. If possible, use a network access control solution to alert IT administrators and employees, when their devices are in need of updates, and enforce those updates by quarantining or blocking non-compliant devices until their security posture is updated. Also, regularly check for firmware updates that address WPA2 vulnerabilities across all connected devices and appliances.
  2. Look out for IoT devices: Direct attention to all connected devices – not just managed and BYOD devices – namely IoT devices that present a challenge as many of them cannot be patched or updated with the most recent firmware. Consider sandboxing IoT devices into a separate part of the network until a larger solution for the WPA2 vulnerabilities is reached. Currently, those organizations that depend on the data processing capabilities of IoT devices should be concerned and take all possible measures to protect and manage the security of these devices.
  3. Maintain consistent visibility into connected endpoints: One of the best ways to identify vulnerabilities is to maintain consistent visibility into connected endpoints. That way, if there is suspicious activity being carried out on the network, or if device specifications have been changed (good indications of a KRACK breach), IT administrators can take actions to control access for the device in question. Consistent visibility makes it easier to establish regular patterns of network behavior, providing important context when it comes to identifying and preventing cyber attacks.
  4. Consider wired networks: While these may seem like a thing of the past, in most organizations, wired internet connections still exist in some form. Encourage employees to connect their managed and professional devices over wired networks where possible, at least until firmware updates are installed and a remediation policy is put in place. For mobile devices and BYOD, ask employees to refrain from engaging in work-related activities over the enterprise Wi-Fi connection until the vulnerability is effectively addressed.
  5. Use WPA2 AES-CCMP as opposed to WEP, WPA/WPA2 TKIP and GCMP: The researchers identified that with WPA-TKIP or GCMP, hackers can not only decrypt encryption keys, but forge and inject new encryption packets. Therefore, it’s better to use a different encryption method until a more concrete solution for secure WPA encryption is reached.

The most important thing to remember about WPA is that there is no use in panicking. Most connected devices and enterprise networks are affected at this point. Mathy Vanhoef and his team at the University of Leuven have done us all a favor by informing us of the vulnerability, giving IT departments and security experts an opportunity to shore up their Wi-Fi security and take measures to prevent data loss.

IoT

IoT Poses Risks in Home, But There Are Ways to Remain Secure

By | IoT | No Comments

Imagine: You’re sitting at home on a conference call for work and, unbeknownst to you, hackers have gained access to the files you’re sharing on the call. How did they do this you ask? It’s really quite simple: through your smart home IoT devices. Because IoT devices like smart fridges, garage doors, home alarms, baby monitors and even toasters are connected to the same wireless network used to host your conference call, hackers can hijack those vulnerable, unsecure devices and gain full access to everything happening on your network. Soon enough, you might discover that they’ve gained access to your organization’s customer data, business plans and internal financial reports.

IoT devices are inherently insecure and there are a myriad of real-world examples of this very kind of occurrence. Take the massive denial of service (DDoS) attack on the Internet traffic company Dyn in 2016. The attack affected major Internet platforms and services such as Airbnb, Amazon, Box and PayPal, to name a few. It was later discovered that the attack targeted over 100,000 Internet-connected devices such as IP cameras, printers, residential gateways and baby monitors to install Mirai malware. The Mirai malware then overwhelmed Dyn-hosted sites with traffic so that they were forced to deny service to users.

The Mirai botnet is only one example. Recently, cybersecurity researchers at Black Hat 2017 proved that the mechanical components of an automated car wash could be hacked, including the entrance and exit doors, dangerously trapping the passengers of the vehicle inside. The hack was achieved by gaining access to internet-connected operating system running the car wash parts, which was protected only by a default password, readily accessible on connected device archival networks, such as the Shodan Network.

Despite these examples, only a handful of IoT device manufacturers are taking heed. As more consumers purchase connected devices – an integral part of the smart home – it’s worth taking a few precautionary measures to prevent the device from wreaking real havoc.

  1. Segment IoT Devices: Most people don’t have two wireless connections in the home, which could make segmenting a challenge, but it’s really quite easy and entirely necessary. A lot of recent 5G networks come with a 2.4G or option with a weaker bandwidth, just in case the higher bandwidth has performance issues. If you have two networks, set up the IoT device on the network with the lower bandwidth and keep it there. You could even create a separate network for all of your IoT devices, if you want to be on the safe side. Make sure to create a different password for your IoT device network so that if hackers commandeer the device, they can’t access private information.
  2. Change Default Passwords: This tip should really be the first direction in any IoT device instruction manual, but it rarely is. The moment that you begin the installation process for an IoT device, make sure to change the default password to something that’s hard to guess and not the same as other passwords that you commonly use. Even using your telephone number presents a risk as hackers could somehow access that information. This step is crucial as the passwords of connected devices are available over the Internet (see the car wash example).
  3. Create a Back-Up Plan: If some of the critical systems in your home are connected devices, make sure that you have a back-up plan in place in case they go haywire. This may seem like a silly enough step, but hacker’s goal is often to inflict physical and psychological damage on their targets in order to extract a ransom payment. A go-to strategy would be to disconnect and reset all of the IoT devices if they start acting out of line, but sometimes even those steps can’t remediate the problem. Try to consult with an expert or cybersecurity professional at the point of purchase and ask them about a continuity plan, or data back-up if the device stores information.

IoT devices are quickly becoming the mainstay of home appliances which is why it’s important to know the risks and have strategy in place that will help you recover in case the connected device is compromised. Until IoT device manufacturers are required to integrate security software into their products, make sure you are taking precautions while implementing connected technology.

National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) is all about sharing knowledge to promote a safer and more secure internet environment for all users. Inform your peers when you hear of threats to stop them from spreading and always remain wary of what you search, receive and send over the internet. Awareness and education are the best ways to beat hackers!

Stay #CyberAware

Portnox CORE is the Proud Winner of the Computing Security Awards in the NAC Category!

By | Our Technology | No Comments

Portnox is proud to announce that it is the winner of the Computing Security Awards 2017 “Network Access Control Solution of the Year”. Portnox’s on-premise NAC solution, Portnox CORE, was nominated as the best NAC solution of the year through a submission process open to the public, and was selected as the winner by Computing Security Awards’ board of judges. The announcement was made at an event for all of the nominees in London, England on October 12th.

While this is the first Computing Security Award won by Portnox, it is not the first time that Portnox CORE has been recognized as a top NAC solution by industry leaders in 2017. Portnox CORE was recognized with the following awards in 2017: Cybersecurity Excellence Awards, Best of InteropITX in the Security category and the Info Security Product Guide.

Portnox CORE is a leading solution for on-premise NAC that provides complete visibility into the enterprise network, including connected endpoints of various types in various locations, as well as control mechanisms to ensure that security policies are thoroughly enforced. Portnox CORE was one of the first NAC solutions to integrate an Internet of Things visibility radar, which includes the ability to automatically register new MAC addresses, providing enterprise IT teams with a security solution for IoT devices. In addition, Portnox CORE is an agentless solution, making the transition into BYOD and emerging technologies a simple and natural process for the digitally transformative enterprise.

Empowered by the recognition from the Computing Security Awards win, Portnox’s development teams will continue to introduce innovative, demand-driven features into Portnox CORE’s product offering. Portnox’s goal has always been to provide visibility and access control into all endpoints, everywhere, and Portnox CORE as a key role in helping us realize that vision.

Portnox CLEAR, Portnox’s cloud-based NAC product, has also been recognized by a number of industry leaders for taking a leap into the cloud security space ahead of other major NAC and cybersecurity solution vendors

Read more about Portnox CORE, Portnox’s NAC solutions, or request a demo!