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Network Security

Secure WiFi

Securing Your WiFi Network: The Case for Implementing Enterprise-Grade WiFi Security Now, and Why Shared Passkeys Should Be a Historical Bygone

By | Network Security | No Comments

Are you using a pre-shared passkey to allow access to the organization’s WiFi?

Securing WiFi access in businesses has been historically weak. Oftentimes, companies protect their Wi-Fi access with a pre-shared password, sometimes posting it on whiteboards within the company or placing it for all to use at the reception desk to enable easy access. This is primarily for modern convenience purposes, as businesses would like to enable productivity and collaboration with contractors and guests, as well as allow for staff mobility within the premises of the enterprise.

What’s the problem? And why should I care?

The problem with this practice is that this is a “home style” level of security that places the company’s data and assets (whether intellectual or physical) at risk of being damaged or stolen. If an outsider successfully connects to the company’s WiFi, they could bypass the Firewall and all traditional cyber security mechanisms applied by most companies today. Once inside, they could damage the organization’s reputation by accessing illegal web sites, or company data, whether it resides on premises or in the cloud. Accessing these items is easy, and there are many automated network tools that can enable “non-techies” to do the work. Additionally, this type of hack could easily be achieved via simple social engineering. Another reason to be worried about the use of passkeys is that WiFi hacks and damages do not require being physically present at the organization. These simple actions could be taken from a nearby public space such as the parking lot and would leave no trace. Trying to track who accessed the enterprise WiFi by using a shared password is almost impossible.

Click here to watch a video demonstrating CLEAR’s easy set up

Internal players – disgruntled and former employees

One of the scariest scenarios are the hacks performed by disgruntled employees that can use their remaining access to perform nefarious activities, including damaging, sabotaging or stealing company data, resources and assets. Roughly one out of five organizations has experienced a data breach by a former employee. The Gartner analysis of criminal insiders found that 29 percent of employees stole information after quitting or being fired for future gains, while 9 percent were motivated by simple sabotage.

Attacks by disgruntled employees who commit deliberate sabotage or intellectual property theft are considered to be among the costliest risks to an organization. For example, one of our customers, a food manufacturer in the United States, fired an employee. The disgruntled employee decided to get even. Using the organization’s Wi-Fi password, he connected to the network from the parking lot and changed the temperature setting for the refrigerators. The result was the destruction of food inventory to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Bottom line?  Former employees, even those who left amicably, should no longer have access to any part of the network.

Removing employees’ access to all accounts immediately after leaving the company is the best practice to use; however, typically it is not possible to revoke all access due to shared passwords for certain systems and services. In some cases, these systems do not require a password at all, such as printers and Point of Sale devices. For certain organizations, such as law firms and medical facilities, these represent the crown jewels in terms of company data and therefore should be highly secured.

Do I have important assets on the network that I should be protecting?

With the growing numbers of Wi-Fi connected IoT devices (IP cameras, printers, etc.) in the enterprise, each network has a lot of devices that could be compromised and thereby causing data leaks, denial of service attacks or severe damage to the organization. Therefore, ensuring that IoT endpoints are segmented into separate sections of the network and cannot be accessed by outsiders is crucial.

What is the alternative to PSK?

Using enterprise-grade authentication & access services is a good idea.
The best security practice would be to have digital certificates, but at the very least, it is recommended to establish a personal identity-based authentication solution. It would enforce network access via unique user credentials, thereby dramatically reducing the chances of unauthorized access to the organization’s Wi-Fi network, and it would ensure a much better security standard over the shared password practice. Traditionally, this was difficult, as setting up such services required high levels of technological knowledge, as well as extensive maintenance and long and complicated deployments.

This is exactly where Portnox CLEAR can help.

Portnox CLEAR

CLEAR is a cloud-delivered, WiFi access control solution that among other benefits provides a cloud-RADIUS, therefore requiring no training or skilled personal to deploy and operate. There is no overhead, as there is no equipment to install or maintain, and the service is inexpensive and based on the number of devices in the enterprise. Additionally, there is no need to manage a WiFi password as authentication is based on user accounts or digital certificates (customer’s choice), and therefore all passwords are unique. In less than 10 minutes, companies are deploying CLEAR’s enterprise-grade Wi-Fi security, providing the highest level of security to any enterprise, large or small.

See a Demo of CLEAR – Please fill out this form:



network access control gartner

NAC is dead? The Resurrection of NAC

By | Cloud Security, Network Access Management, Network Security | No Comments

Some argue that NAC (Network Access Control) is no longer relevant in today’s world of the mobile workforce and distributed (or decentralized) organizations that have moved to using cloud applications for the most part. Adding the fact that many organizations are allowing personal devices to be used in the corporate environment (BYOD) and the fact that IoT devices are used everywhere, some might consider this to be further evidence to the conclusion that NAC is no longer relevant or needed.

In 2004 the first NAC products came on the scene and signaled the start of a new segment in Information Security. At the time, most organizations still had a physical perimeter, desktops were still the main PC to be used at the workplace and laptops were starting to make a wide appearance. BYOD (bring your own device), IoT (Internet of Things) and multi-branch, geo-distributed organizations that rely heavily on cloud services were not prevalent yet. Accordingly, the standards for NAC were very different from what they are today and mainly focused on the wired environment. NAC solutions were then primarily based on using 802.1x pre-connect enforcement with supplicants which were not part of the operating system. Organizations trying to implement NAC solutions only had the option of deploying 802.1x – which ended up with long, complex deployment and implementation, leaving them with a bad taste for NAC.

Over the past 20 years, NAC technologies have evolved exponentially. Vendors introduced control and discovery techniques that have yielded better and faster deployments and ROI. Just as the enterprise network and endpoints have evolved, NAC solutions have evolved from merely allowing or blocking endpoints onto the network into a broader security solution that provides network visibility, endpoint profiling, security posture assessments, risk management and compliance.

Additionally, some solutions have scaled to suit the modern workforce, heterogeneous networks, hybrid cloud and on-prem environments, diverse endpoint environments (such as IoT and BYOD) and globally distributed organizations. This increase in number of devices connecting to the network and change of working environments   has been our reality for the past 10 years and has evoked a new NAC. Hence, the resurrection of NAC continues to be upon us.

Future of NAC
At this point in 2019, over 60% of enterprise data is stored in cloud applications (public cloud, private cloud and a hybrid of both). By 2020, just a year from now, it is predicted that 83% of enterprise workloads will be taking place in the cloud (1). According to IDG, 77% of enterprises have at least one application or a portion of their enterprise computing infrastructure in the cloud. Additionally, more technology-dependent industries including manufacturing, high-tech, and telecom are being led by executive management to become 100% cloud-based. Therefore, it is crucial to make sure that only company owned and secured devices gain access to corporate intelectual property and information in the inner most circles of the enterprise. According to Gartner research , by 2023 80% of enterprises will adopt two or more cloud-based security services. This is no coinsidence. The complexities in the cyber security landscape alongside the increasing shortage in skilled security professionals is leading towards a greater adoption of cloud-based security services and specifically to the adoption of NAC as-a-Service.

Another factor in future solutions is related to increaseing IoT adoption by enterprises and factories. Visibility and monitoring of IoT must be done by an agentless solution. We believe that having agentless solutions that are centrally controlled will be preferred by many organizations in 2019 and the years to come.

Lighter, adaptable and agile solutions will be necessary in the new era. Enterprises will transition into using easier NAC solutions such as centralized NAC, agentless NAC, NAC delivered from the cloud and Software-as-a-Service. These NAC solutions will save time and money on deployment, training and implementation, while at the same time providing the visibility and accuracy needed to handle today’s complex and hybrid networks. Next-gen solutions are able to cope fully with today’s decentralized organizations and the old NAC configurations will no longer suffice as they are perimeter focused.

 

Conclusion

NAC was effective for the problem it was created to solve in the mid-2000s, but subsequent technological advancements in cloud applications and the mass-adoption of mobile computing devices by the mobile workforce, and IoT have introduced new complexities and challenges. The new computing model requires new cyber security solutions, and the new, NAC technologies are uniquely positioned to be among them. Cloud-native solutions will address concerns of lengthy deployments and geo-distribution. Agentless and centralized solutions will shorten and simplify implementations and everyday usage that were once the dread of CISOs and IT security teams in the enterprise.

 

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You can see the ease of use and the benefits of cloud-delivered NAC by starting your own a free trial of CLEAR (Cloud-delivered solution) today.

Read the following to learn more about the NAC as-a-Service solutions, and how they simplify cloud access control.

You can also schedule a demo for CORE (on-premises solution) and learn more about agentless and centralized NAC as well as regulatory compliance.


  1. LogicMonitor’s Cloud Vision 2020: The Future of the Cloud Study
  2. The State of Network Security in the Cloud Era, Lawrence Orans, 2018 Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit.
  3. 2.9 million according to (ISC)2

Top Five Cybersecurity Trends to Expect in 2019

By | Network Security | No Comments

From a certain perspective, 2018 hasn’t been as dramatic a cyber-security year as 2017, in that we haven’t seen as many global pandemics like WannaCry. Still, Ransomware, zero-day exploits, and phishing attacks, were among the biggest threats facing IT security teams this year. 2018 has not been a dull year as far as breaches. The cycle of exploit to discovery to weaponization has become shorter, and unfortunately, it has become more difficult to protect the enterprise network and the various devices connected to it. In 2017, roughly 63% of organizations experienced an attempted ransomware attack, with 22% reporting these incidents occurred on a weekly basis (*ESG Master Survey Results, 2018 IT Spending Intentions Survey, December 2017). We expect to wind up with close statistics for 2018.

Here are five trends we believe will dominate cyber security in 2019.

  1. Security and Privacy Merge.
    Despite the fact that everyone is still trying to understand the new privacy landscape and perhaps because they haven’t fully grasped the new realities, everyone is paying attention. Perhaps it is our ever increasing focus on privacy in general and GDPR specifically. Perhaps it is because more organizations will be working long hours to embrace the compliance measures that are needed to protect privacy that we won’t see a major lawsuit against a company. All we know is that we have seen an increase in companies seeking NAC solutions to keep up with all the new compliance regulations and it is very satisfying to hear that sigh of relief, when a company has implemented their solution.
  2. AI + ML = forensics and investigations.
    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are going to be implemented into the arena of practical usage in cyber security – mainly for forensics and identification of culprits in cyber events. Investigating security events is costly both in terms of time and the expertise required. We believe that AI and ML are well positioned to help in these investigations for obvious reasons, relating to computing power and specialized programming of what to look for and the ability to learn. AI and ML enable the clustering and analysis of monumental volumes of data that would otherwise be impossible to do within a reasonable amount of time even if you had the best trained minds in the business working on the investigation.
  3. Ransomware – more targeted attacks are expected against wealthy and famous individuals.
    Social networks offer a world of insights and information on almost anyone who has an account. Unfortunately, it provides a lot of details that assist cyber offenders in the monetization of attacks (due to bitcoin) and the ease of performing spear phishing attacks – all will be combined for a more targeted approach.
  4. IoT security issues will increase.
    IoT will be deployed in more business usages and scenarios. The risk will rise and eventually this will cause more issues with a few headlines of devices that were used to hack networks.
  5. The conversation – Whose job it is to protect organizations in the public and private sector?
    Nationwide attacks on large businesses will bring up the discussion of who should protect a country and a business from cyber security attacks. Should the state and country be active in the defense of the private sector? In the same respect, you wouldn’t expect a bank branch to deploy anti-missile defense systems against the possibility of an offending country.

At Portnox, we will continue to innovate our network security and risk control tools to provide solutions to all, empowering our customers with valuable, holistic solutions to protect their networks.

From all of us here at Portnox, we wish you happy holidays and a great new year!

onboarding your device

The Best Ways to Secure Device Onboarding in The Enterprise

By | Cloud Security, Network Security | No Comments

With the prevalence of digital transformation in the enterprise, there is a clear necessity to balance IoT security issues and BYOD security measures that will prevent suspicious or malicious devices from gaining access to the enterprise’s assets and data centers, while at the same time, making sure that productivity and easy onboarding of devices is maintained. Employees, guests and contractors are bringing all kinds of Wi Fi enabled devices to the enterprise environment and they expect easy and quick network connectivity.

Onboarding is the process in which new devices gain access to the enterprise for the first time. Unfortunately IT departments can sometimes experience additional workloads while endeavoring to get all the devices on the network so as not to hinder business productivity. At the same time, if they are not handling the process with top security standards in mind, they could potentially place users, devices, enterprise data and the network itself at risk. The question arises: how should IT Security teams allow for BYOD, IoT, contractors, guests, etc. to securely and quickly connect to the network without placing any of its components at risk of a breach or ransomware attack? The answer: automation.

By automating the entire onboarding process enterprises can achieve the following benefits:

  • Reducing the costs that are typically associated with manual work (including configuration and support activities).
  • Enhancing productivity – getting team members, contractors and guests connected to work faster.
  • Increasing end-user satisfaction – instead of hassling end-users with onboarding procedures, the whole process can and should be seamless.
  • Decreasing the risks – unmanaged, unpatched, high-risk devices should be blocked or connected from the beginning to a separate segment of the network from where the key corporate assets are stored (the “crown jewels” of the company).

Easy Onboarding

Employees, students, contractors, partners and guests should onboard their devices once and then automatically re-authenticate after that, within an environment that continuously monitors all devices on the networks and automatically provides a risk score for every device. This ongoing scoring allows security teams to understand the security posture of the devices and the network as a whole, at any given moment. At the same time, there is no need to have end users repeatedly re-enter credentials on subsequent network connections unless a device is deemed to have a high risk-score. This way the enterprise can easily onboard BYOD devices belonging to employees that are traveling, working remotely or working at a satellite office location. Additionally, this allows onboarding of IoT and smart devices for business such as flat screens, printers and IoT devices, as well as gaming consoles, smart refrigerators and more. These items, of course, must be on a separate segment from where company assets are kept.

Reducing Risks on the Network

A while ago Ofer Amitai, Portnox CEO, wrote about tips for securing endpoint devices on college campuses, institutions that are always desiring a relatively simple onboarding process. He discussed how changes in onboarding and guest access policies could reduce risks and improve network visibility and control. The principals for securing the enterprise require these steps and more. Having a clear onboarding set of policies will allow IT teams to have automated actions applied (see examples in the next section).

After handling the company’s initial network security audit and collecting the security posture of all devices, it is important to make sure that the enterprise authorization policies include conducting automated and continuous security assessments of the network.  This way, every device employs baseline security measures before being allowed to connect.  Additionally, the IT security team should use granular policies to govern the level of access while maintaining full visibility and control over network connected devices with the ability to revoke access at any time.

Automated Device Onboarding and Network Authentication

Having an automated onboarding set of policies can allow for automated actions such as:

  • Immediately allowing Internet access
  • Blocking/ disconnecting
  • Segmenting a device to a separate network section
  • Remediation actions

For example, IoT devices are considered to be easy to hack.  Therefore, once connected to the enterprise network, these devices should be separated from where core assets are located.  Having different segments on the enterprise network is a good solution for that.  Additionally, if a visitor is being connected, the visitor should gain access to the Internet and not to company files, even when plugging the computer to the wired network.

Two important advanced guest network onboarding features are recommended to be included:

  • Easy guest access – allowing for simple and fast connections together with the ability to continuously monitor all devices and ensure security.
  • Agentless access – once the IT administrators have set up the onboarding policy – contractors and guests on protected networks should be able to self-onboard without installing an endpoint agent.

Acquiring Advanced Onboarding Capabilities

One of the technologies that can help with safe onboarding is network access control (NAC).  In the past, companies used only desktops and laptops, connected and authenticated over a wired network, however; nowadays wireless networks and mobile technologies have introduced personal devices (via BYOD policies) and Internet of Things (IoT) to the workplace.  In addition, increasingly stringent compliance standards, such as PCI-DSS, SOX, and ISO standards require companies to openly communicate their security controls to external auditing authorities.  All of these can be achieved via NAC solutions. Network access security should be a priority for all companies moving forward.

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Every enterprise today must support a rapidly proliferating world of devices and platforms.  From an operational view point, this shouldn’t pose an obstruction of workflows and productivity. Ideally, the enterprise IT team will automate and secure network onboarding and authentication so that the IT helpdesk doesn’t have to intervene when guests, contractors and IoT devices need to connect. Additionally, an effective plan for secure network onboarding will on one hand improve end-user experience for BYOD, IoT, users and guests and on the other hand improve IT security as part of a layered protection strategy.

Looking to set IT security policies and automate your device onboarding?

Portnox CLEAR offers easy onboarding while never compromising on network security across the enterprise.

Sign Up for Your CLEAR 30 Day Trial Now

Network Security Audit

Conducting Network Security Audits in a Few Simple Steps

By | Network Security, Threat Detection and Response | One Comment

What are the steps necessary to defend your organization’s assets in an optimal framework, while cutting costs at the same time?

If you have spent five minutes on our website or blog, you are probably well-versed on the notion that conducting automated and continuous security assessments of your network is the way to go, where pro-active and preventative security measures are concerned, so as to protect any company’s assets. Still, when new clients get started with one of the Portnox solutions, it is advantageous to kick things off with a simple, yet crucial, security audit. When undertaking an initial security audit, it is important to use the most up-to-date compliance requirements to uphold security protocols. This clearly defines what CISOs should be looking at, and helps in shaping and setting up the future of your automated security monitoring and assessments.

 

Step 1: The Scope of the Security Perimeter

The first step in the auditing process is to clearly define the scope of the audit. For most companies and organizations this will include both managed and unmanaged devices and machines. Managed devices will encompass a list of computers, machines, devices and data bases that belong to the company directly, which contain sensitive company and customer data. Additionally, in a world that includes BYOD policies and IoT connected devices and machines, as well as contractors and visiting guests, the unmanaged segment of the audit should be positioned to continuously update visibility of all connected endpoints. Without clear visibility, it is impossible to create segmentation and remediation procedures. Thirdly, the security perimeter must include definitions relating to software that is allowed and not allowed so as to define a software perimeter as well. Finally, the scope should include all access layers: wired, wireless and VPN connections. In this manner, the scope of the audit will ultimately include all software and devices, in all locations, so as to ultimately define the security perimeter for the company.

 

Step 2: Defining the Threats

The next step is to list potential threats to the security perimeter. Common threats to include in this step would be:

  • Malware – worms, Trojan horses, spyware and ransomware – the most popular form of threats to any organization in the last few years.
  • Employee exposure – making sure that employees in all locations change their passwords periodically and use a certain level of sophistication; (especially with sensitive company accounts) as well as protection against phishing attacks and scams.
  • Malicious Insiders – once onboarding has taken place- employees, contractors and guests – there is the risk of theft or misuse of sensitive information.
  • DDoS Attacks – Distributed Denial of Service attacks happen when multiple systems flood a targeted system such as a web server, overload it and destroy its functionality.
  • BYOD, IoT – these devices tend to be somewhat easier to hack and therefore must be completely visible on the network.
  • Physical breaches, natural disasters – less common but extremely harmful when they occur.

 

Step 3: Prioritizing and Risk Scoring

There are many factors that go into creating the priorities and risk scoring.

  • Cyber security trends – working with a network access control system in place that factors in the most common and current threats along with the less frequent, could save you and your CISOs a lot of time and cut costs, while at the same time defending the organization in an optimal framework.
  • Compliance – includes the kind of data that is to be handled, whether the company stores/transmits sensitive financial or personal information, who specifically has access to which systems.
  • Organization history – If the organization has experienced a data breach or cyber-attack in the past.
  • Industry trends – understanding the types of breeches, hacks and attacks within your specific industry should be factored in when creating your scoring system.

 

Step 4: Assessing the Current Security Posture

At this point you should start to have an initial security posture available for each item included in your initial scope definition. Ideally, with the right access control systems in place, no internal biases affect your initial audit or any continuous risk assessments performed automatically later on. Additionally, making sure that all connected devices have the latest security patches, firewall and malware protection will assure more accuracy in your ongoing assessments.

 

Step 5: Formulating Automated Responses and Remediation Action

Establishing a corresponding set of processes designed to eliminate the risks discussed in step 2 includes a few solutions that should be included in this step:

  • Network monitoring – establishing continuous automated monitoring and creating automated risk assessments will lead to improved risk management. Cyber offenders are typically working to gain access to networks. Activating software that automatically takes notice of new devices, software updates/changes, security patches, firewall installments and malware protection is the best way for any organization to protect itself. Ideally your CISOs should be alerted to any questionable device, software, activity, unknown access attempts, and more, so as to be a step ahead of any harmful activity whether it is maliciously done or not. Network Access Controls such as the solutions offered by Portnox offer 24/7 risk control and risk management and use machine learning to identify cyber offenders, while at the same time cutting costs oIoT Ip Cameran employee hours and replacing expensive systems with cloud distributed software, pay-as-you-go and scalable options.
  • Software Updates – Making sure that everyone on the network has the latest software updates and patches, firewalls etc. It is highly recommended to take advantage of this built-in feature in Network Access Control Software that alerts you when those are required.
  • Data backups and data segmentation – relatively simple but crucial steps, because obviously consistent and frequent data back-ups along with segmentation will ensure minimal damage should your organization ever fall to malware or physical cyber-attacks.
  • Employee education and awareness – training for new employees and continuous security updates for all employees to make sure best practices are implemented company-wide, such as how to spot phishing campaigns, increasing password complexity, two-factor authentication and more.

 

Conclusion

If you have completed these simple but crucial steps, you have finished your first internal security audit! Now you can proceed to establishing your ongoing automated risk assessment, management and controls to secure your company’s assets for the short, medium and long terms. Your first security audit, when done properly will serve you well as a touchstone for future risk assessments and self-audits. Monitoring all devices and machines as well as software over time is the best way to control the risks within your device and software security perimeter. The continuous fine-tuning of your controls and processes will maintain ongoing visibility as well as the ability to properly assess your overall preparedness for cyber-threats along with the ability to manage risks and remediate attacks.

Due to the proliferation of wireless networks and mobile devices, through BYOD and IoT, the workplace has become, on the one hand, a more agile and flexible environment, increasing productivity and employee satisfaction, and on the other, a breeding ground for vulnerabilities and cyber risk. As NAC solutions address the needed steps to audit your organization’s security while also providing intelligence into network behavior through various integrations and methods for achieving compliance, they are well suited to help meet and address these risks. For these reasons, NAC, today, is a must-have part of a robust self-auditing security mechanism. By controlling access to the network with a NAC solution, organizations control their exposure to a wide array of emerging digital business risks, keeping their organizational network healthy and secure.

Now that you have completed your initial network security audit, you can focus your attention on keeping your network safe.
A core factor in achieving that is to have full visibility and control of all devices connecting to the network in real time.

Implementing Network Access Control solutions addresses top security concerns and therefore is a crucial step in preparing your network for security audits.
Find out more here:
The Importance of a NAC Solution White Paper

Portnox Wins Two Cybersecurity Excellence Awards

By | Cloud Security, Network Access Management, Network Security, Our Technology | No Comments

We’re excited to share that Portnox won the Cyber Security Excellence Award in two categories, including:

  • Silver Winner for Most Innovative Cybersecurity Company: Portnox
  • Bronze Winner for Cloud Security category: Portnox CLEAR

“Congratulations to Portnox for being recognized as a winner in the Most Innovative Cybersecurity Company and Cloud Security categories of the 2018 Cybersecurity Excellence Awards,” said Holger Schulze, CEO of Cybersecurity Insiders and founder of the 400,000-member Information Security Community on LinkedIn that organizes the awards program. “With over 400 entries in more than 70 categories, the 2018 awards are highly competitive and all winners truly reflect the very best in today’s cybersecurity industry.”

The 2018 Cybersecurity Excellence Awards are an annual program that recognizes products, companies and individuals that exhibit innovation, excellence and noteworthy leadership in the information security space, based on the strength of their nomination and the popular vote from members of the Information Security Community.  You can find Portnox listed among the winners here.

Read more about Portnox CLEAR, Cloud NAC solution or simply Try it Now!

2018 Top Cybersecurity Events Not to Be Missed!

By | Cloud Security, IoT, Network Access Management, Network Security, Our Technology, Threat Detection and Response | No Comments

You want to stay ahead of the game? The following list of cybersecurity events will help … and they are fun too!

Whether you are a security professional, software developer, security administrator, or any other role in the IT security fields, attending a conference is a great way to network with other professionals and learn about the hottest market trends, new developments, improvements, innovation and information.

Plenty of great cybersecurity conferences are coming up in the months ahead and the Portnox team will attend several of these. We’ve identified these top cybersecurity events that should be on your list. Check them out and update your calendar!

Cybertech Israel

January 29- 31, 2018
Tel Aviv, Israel

The event is positioned as a global meeting place, featuring representatives from organizations of all sizes, from multinational corporations to emerging startups. There will be a special pavilion for startups, as well as a competition in which entrepreneurs will present their ideas to a panel of international judges. Topics under discussion during the conference include the Internet of Things (IoT), big data and Finsec New in 2018 is a sister conference and exhibition, AutoTech, focusing on the future of smart mobility and the automotive.

Oracle CloudWorld

February 16, 2018
New York City, USA

Oracle Cloud World brings together forward-looking professionals responsible for finance, operations, supply chain, human resource, sales, marketing, customer service and IT. Learn how leading companies are leveraging the cloud for competitive advantage. Experience what works, what doesn’t, and identify solutions and approaches to accelerate your innovation.

Gartner Identity & Access Management Summit

March 5- 6, 2018
London, UK

The Gartner Identity and Access Management (IAM) Summit will focus on some of the hottest topics for the coming year, including the role of identity management in securing cloud and mobile apps, the IoT and the importance of privileged access management. For those preparing for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), there is also a focus on the role of IAM as it applies to the privacy regulation.

Infosec World 2018

March 19 -21, 2018
Florida, USA

InfoSec World 2018 Conference & Expo is bringing together CISOs, CIOs, CTOs and other security practitioners who will share hands-on and practical advice on a wide range of security topics. From understanding your adversary to learning about the 0-day exploit market to bridging the gap between the technical and business aspects of security, InfoSec World 2018 will offer a chance for security professionals to learn something new and analyze ideas with peers.

Cloud Security Expo

March 21 -22, 2018
London, UK

Cloud Security Expo is the fastest growing section of the Cloud Expo Europe event series attracting a record-breaking 19,926 Enterprise IT & Security Buyers and Specialists in March this year! Cloud Expo Europe Keynote Theatre hosts foremost international technology leaders, including internationally acclaimed and top-rated visionaries, senior industry speakers and executives driving a global transformative shift towards cloud computing and other disruptive technologies. Speakers will deliver their outlook on the future, plus leading CIOs and senior IT professionals will be sharing their roadmaps to digital transformation, where cloud lives in the heart of the engine room. Cloud Security Expo provides the tools, training & techniques to ensure companies are compliant and secure as they transition their business assets to the cloud.

To register for the event, click here.

RSA
April 16-20, 2018
San Francisco, CA, USA

The largest cybersecurity event in the world today. The RSA Conference USA 2018 is dedicated to information security topics including data breaches, Cyber threats, compliance, social engineering, cloud security, risk management, application security, mobile security, governance, data security, legislation and policy, law, cryptography and identity management. It brings together information security professionals from across the globe working in industries such as Computer Software Development Finance, Banking, Healthcare, Government, Pharmaceuticals, and Manufacturing. Hear from world-class speakers on topics such as “The Most Dangerous New Attack Techniques, and What’s Coming Next”.

Interop ITX
April 30 – May 4, 2018
Las Vegas, NV, USA

Interop ITX combines a trusted Conference program with a vendor-neutral Business Hall and lots of networking events. The event is entering its 32nd year serving the IT community and it is an opportunity to learn about technologies and solutionsץ You may not realize how much the show has evolved during that time, growing from a plugfest ensuring network interoperability to an industry-oriented trade show to its current model: a week-long event centered around its conference program, including educational sessions, long-form tutorials, mainstage keynotes, sponsored content and a business hall showcasing technology.

Our CEO is Speaking! Sign up for his hands-on IoT workshop here.

Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit
June 4- 7, 2018
National Harbor, MD, USA

The Gartner Security & Risk Management Summit 2018 will focus on practices and strategies that will provide cost-effective security and risk programs in order to support digital business and drive the success of your business or organization.

Among the exhibiting companies are IBM, Thales, Cylance, Varonis, Symantec, HP enterprise, Verizon, Sentinel, AT&T.

InfoSec Europe
June 5-7, 2018
London, UK

Infosecurity Europe (Infosec) is the region’s number one information security event featuring Europe’s largest and most comprehensive conference programme and over 400 exhibitors showcasing the most relevant information security solutions and products to over 19,500 information security professionals. Each year this conference features many sessions on NAC. Watch this space!

BlackHat USA
August 4 – 9, 2018
Las Vegas, NV, USA

Black Hat is the most technical and relevant global information security event series in the world. For more than 18 years, Black Hat has provided attendees with the very latest in information security research, development, and trends in a strictly vendor-neutral environment. These high-profile global events and training are driven by the needs of the security community, striving to bring together the best minds in the industry. Black Hat inspires professionals at all career levels, encouraging growth and collaboration among academia, world-class researchers, and leaders in the public and private sectors.

Contact us to schedule private product demos (Portnox CORE for on-Premise NAC and Portnox CLEAR for cloud-based NAC) at one of these shows. We look forward to seeing you there and beginning a conversation with you around network security!

 

Portnox’s Predictions for Cybersecurity Trends in 2018

By | Cloud Security, IoT, Network Access Management, Network Security, Our Technology, Threat Detection and Response | No Comments

2017 was a very busy year for Portnox, yet throughout we aimed to address cybersecurity trends through our product offerings – Portnox CORE and Portnox CLEAR. With the highest number of ransomware attacks on record in 2017, we introduced a Rapid Ransomware Response and Control feature to our on-premise NAC solution, Portnox CORE, as well as the ability to see and control Internet of Things (IoT) devices through the IoT Visibility Radar. Portnox CLEAR, our cloud solution for network access control and risk management, was introduced to the market, and with its features for ensuring business continuity and securing the mobile workforce. The ability of our products to adequately address 2017 received commendation in the form of various industry awards and recognitions from leading publications and security experts.
Looking forward to 2018, the security landscape will shift and focus more heavily on IoT security, blockchain trends, automation and workforce mobility.

Here are some of our insights on what the 2018 cybersecurity landscape will look like:

  1. Extension of Automation: Together with AI and machine intelligence trends, automation will likely take center stage in 2018 as the leading security trend. Microsoft recently announced that it will begin automated anti-virus updates through its Windows Defender, which means that users and organizations will no longer have a choice when it comes to patching endpoints and software. This is good news, because it ensures that more actors have adequate security postures, and it makes sense for modular devices (like IoT) that present difficulties when it comes to firmware upgrades. Yet automation also creates challenges, namely for industries dependent on older versions of software, firmware and operating systems, such as healthcare and finance. Automated security updates could put the business continuity of these organizations at risk, and with potentially life-threatening and economically risky consequences. In addition, automated security updates across the board could actually make it easier for hackers to carry out large-scale attacks that will affect a larger number of endpoints.
  2. Blockchain and the Hacking of Applications: While many believe that the blockchain is “unhackable”, in the last year we have seen an increase in the number of attacks against blockchain-based applications. The vulnerabilities do not arise from the blockchain itself, but rather the applications that run on the blockchain. Social engineering will be used to extract private keys. Another possible blockchain hack, which has already been proven possible, is through other blockchain technologies such as Ethereum, which is an organization that’s committed to being open source for third-party applications. This creates a vulnerability because almost all applications have bugs can be manipulated by hackers as an attack surface.
  3. DDoS Ransomware: Creating a new and more pungent form of blackmail, DDoS and ransomware are joining forces to topple enterprise progress in digital transformation, while reaping monetary benefits. These attacks are made possible by using botnets, or large groups of “zombie” devices – which often happen to be Internet of Things devices, such as webcams – to funnel traffic to a malware-infected web address that, in turn, extract data from the accessing endpoint and demand ransoms for the return of that encrypted data. These attacks are often called “sinkhole” attacks because the DDoS traffic is being directed to sites that contain dangerous malware. With the wide adoption of Internet of Things devices in the enterprise, and the rise in ransomware demands, it’s likely that we’ll be seeing more of these attacks in the next year.
  4. Growing Regulation of IoT Security: Regulations governing IoT security features are beginning to be drafted, but there is still not enough demand from the consumer side to warrant manufacturer investment in security features. This begs a major question in 2018 of whether governments, in similar fashion to the US and EU, will begin issuing security regulations on IoT device manufacturers that protect consumers and companies from digital risk. Together with GDPR and other compliance regulations, we are likely to see more governments and industry authorities stepping up to enforce privacy, safety and security regulations on IoT manufacturers.
  5. Mobility of the Workforce: With more employees working remotely, organizations are enjoying a significant drop in their capital expenditures (many have even given up on the physical office space), while directing operational expenditures at digital transformation trends such as cloud and BYOD. Workforce mobility is a good thing for companies’ balance sheets, but the technological flexibility it affords results in more areas of cybersecurity vulnerability for the enterprise network. Companies that are set on accommodating mobile workforce trends will be investing in more endpoint, network and cloud security solutions that protect access and assets across a variety of locations and in various connected environments.

At Portnox, we will continue innovating our access control offerings to provide solutions to 2018 security trends and challenges, providing our customers with valuable, holistic solutions to protect their networks.
Here’s to a great 2018!

Four Tips on Keeping Your Network Safe During the Holidays

By | Network Security | No Comments

The holiday season is a busy time for all of us and full of excitement. Yet as employees are likely to be working from home over their vacation, or from other remote locations such as hotels or even near the pool, there are some key steps that organizations should take to secure their network for remote access:

  1. Device Patching: Ensure that all devices accessing the corporate network are up-to-date on their security and anti-virus patches. As there will be managed, and, likely, a good deal of unmanaged devices accessing the network, send out email communication to employees ahead of the holidays with a request to update their devices. In addition, if using a network access control solution, set a policy that requires the latest patch updates in granting access. That way, even if a device isn’t updated, it will be blocked access until its posture is updated.
  2. Take Note of Your Inventory: Take the holiday season as an opportunity to gain a clear understanding of your inventory, namely unmanaged devices that are likely to be used by employees while working remotely. Ask employees to share information on the devices that they use at home to get a better understanding of any potential vulnerabilities, asking employees to patch and update those devices as well. In addition, get an understanding of which managed devices will remain in the office and ensure they are updated.
  3. Multi-factor Authentication is a Must! Deploy a VPN solution that requires MFA for network and cloud access. MFA ensures that employees are more cognizant when accessing the network. In addition, set the security policies for remote VPN access to reflect those of your network. Lastly, let employees know that network security will be on high alert in your holiday message (it could be the same message sent about patch updates).
  4. Automate Where Possible: Network security admins are no different in that they want to enjoy time with their families over the holidays, so automate security actions where possible. By deploying a network access control solution that automates network security actions based on policy, security admins can ensure that their networks are secure, without ever stepping foot into the office. And, as mentioned above, if admins communicate with employees regarding heightened security and patch updates, it’s unlikely that they will receive frantic IT calls over the break. In a word – network security admins that want to enjoy their holiday break should automate, automate, automate!

Of course, the most important tip of them all is – enjoy the holiday season by keeping network access secure and vulnerability free! With Portnox’s network access control solutions you can control access from anywhere to control exposure to digital business risks, wherever and whenever they may arise.

Try Portnox CLEAR – Network Access Control-as-a-Service

Portnox 2018 Security Predictions

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Portnox’s CEO and Co-Founder Ofer Amitai shares his 2018 security predictions with Dan Patterson at TechRepublic. The discussion kicks off with the rise of IoT devices and the likelihood of regulations on IoT device manufacturers and why there is a market failure. Next, Ofer continues with the rise of DDoS ransomware attacks and how they might look like in 2018. Then he covers the benefits associated with the rise of automation with security solutions, concluding by touching on the potential hacking of blockchain applications.

Check out the full video here for our predictions on the state of the 2018 security landscape.